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Maintaining Your Windows With Ease

3 Tips For Preventing Fowl Repercussions To Your Windows

Posted by on 9:07 am in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 3 Tips For Preventing Fowl Repercussions To Your Windows

Have you ever heard a loud thump followed by the sound of glass breaking? Chances are, you have. It is not uncommon for birds to fly into the sides of a house, particularly the windows. It is estimated that around 365 to 988 million birds die from flying into windows. If a bird hits your windows hard enough, it can cause them to break. Fortunately, there are ways to prevent such fowl…err…foul instances from occurring. Window Replacement the Right Way After a bird has annihilated your glass window, your first step would be to replace the window. However, birds often crash into windows because they are either unable to see the glass or they see a reflection of the sky in the glass. Rather than simply replacing the window, replace the window the right way. Ask a window repair specialist about installing mesh screens on your window. Mesh screens help protect your window and may even save the life of birds in flight. Rather than slamming into your window, the bird would instead hit the mesh screening, which can help prevent another broken window. Furthermore, the mesh makes the window more visible to birds, meaning they are less likely to hit the window to begin with. You can also ask the specialist about windows that are less reflective. Many new windows have various options that you can choose from ranging from the number of panes they have – single, double, and even triple – to their reflective properties. Choosing a window that is less reflective when you replace your window can prevent birds from flying into them. Window Film for Visibility The goal is to ensure that windows are visible to birds in flight. One way you can do so is to have your windows replaced with frosted glass windows. Of course, not everyone has the money to replace their windows entirely. For some people, it is a matter of having the glass replaced or repaired. Fortunately, you can still make the windows more visible. If you opt to have the glass itself replaced or repaired rather than the entire window, apply a highly visible window film to the glass. Ensure that the pattern is relatively close together, otherwise birds may still perceive openings in the design that they can fly through. For example, striped patterns spaced too far apart can look like openings wide enough for a bird to fit through. Instead of using a striped pattern, use something that offers decent enough coverage that will deter birds away from you window. You can purchase stained glass decals to place over your windows. Not only do stain glass decals make your windows look pretty and let some color into your home, they also make your windows visible to birds. Proper Placement of Bird-Friendly Items If you have bird feeders and birdbaths outside your home, move them closer to the house. Moving bird-friendly items closer to the house ensures that birds cannot pick up enough speed to harm themselves or your windows when they fly away. Ensure that these items are with a few feet from your home at the maximum. At most, a bird may still hit the windows, but only hard enough to stun them rather than kill them. If you find that birds are still flying...

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Shopping For New Windows? Vocabulary You Should Know To Avoid Fenestration Frustration

Posted by on 3:40 pm in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Are you thinking about upgrading your house with brand new windows? If you are like most people, you probably feel like you are visiting a foreign country when you step inside of the window showroom. As salespeople throw around unfamiliar jargon, it might be easy to feel intimidated by your decision. However, by brushing up on your window terminology, you can streamline your shopping trip. Here are some vocabulary words you should know to avoid fenestration frustration: 1: Window Types Which type of windows from a site like do you need? Although you might have a rough idea of the general shape you are after, the fact of the matter is that there are several different kinds of windows—each with their own set of advantages and disadvantages. Here are the descriptions of a few basic window types, so you know what to ask for: Double-Hung: Are you looking for standard rectangular windows where the bottom slides up and down? If so, ask for double-hung windows. The double-hung variety is perfect for most rooms of your house, including areas near decks and walkways. Casement: Instead of having separate sashes that slide up and down, casement windows are fixed on a single hinge and open like a door. Some casement windows even swing indoors, so that you can clean them easily.  Picture: Unlike other types of windows, which are meant to open and close to improve ventilation, picture windows are fixed. However, because these windows don’t contain opening mechanisms and extra panes, they offer a completely unobstructed view of the outside world. Gliding: Gliding windows are like double-hung windows, except they open side-to-side instead of up and down. Bay: To give your home a nostalgic twist or to add a little extra floor space, some people choose bay windows. These special windows project out of your home, so that you can create interesting reading areas or exterior architectural details. To make your window installation a little easier, analyze which types of windows your home already contains and look for a similar style. However, if you work with a professional window contractor, you can update your home however you like.     2: Glass Types After you have an idea of which type of window you are looking for, you will be asked which type of glass you want for the panes. Unfortunately, unless you work in construction, it can be hard to know what you need. Here are some types of glass, and which rooms they work well for: Float Glass: If you are looking for run-of-the-mill, flat, clear glass, you should ask for float glass. This type of glass is created by mixing sand, calcium, and other additives together and then melting it at around 1500°F. Afterwards, the mixture is poured into a molten tin bath, where it floats on the surface before it cools. Float glass is perfect for upper windows, or parts of the house where they wouldn’t be subjected to intense heat or impact. Low-E: When light pours into your home, it can heat up your space fast. Unfortunately, if you have windows on the west side of your house, the afternoon sun can spell trouble for your energy bill. However, Low-E glass is glazed so that it reflects as much as 96% of long-wave, heat generating sunshine....

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3 Considerations When Replacing Or Repairing Your Auto Glass

Posted by on 2:11 pm in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Auto glass is surprisingly strong and resilient, especially in modern-era vehicles. But in the end, glass is still glass, meaning that your windshield and other windows will always be vulnerable to breaks, chips and scratches. Unfortunately, addressing these issues isn’t always as simple as slapping a new piece of glass into place. Here are three potential wrinkles in the process that can be smoothed out with the aid of skilled professionals. 1. Cure Time No matter how expert the installation, an auto glass replacement requires a certain amount of time to “take.” That’s because the urethane adhesives used to create a tight seal between windshield and frame need to cure, hardening into a reliable, waterproof join. If you simply drive away immediately after the installation, your windshield won’t be firmly attached — meaning that your car won’t be safe to drive. The adequate amount of cure time for your windshield replacement depends on factors such as: One-part vs. two-part urethanes – One-part urethanes typically take up to 12 hours to cure even under optimal conditions. Two-part urethanes use chemicals to speed the curing process but still require at least one hour of curing time before the vehicle can be used. Humidity and temperature – One-part urethanes are dependent on environmental conditions. The more moisture is present in the air, the more oxygen is available to the curing process, allowing for faster curing. The outdoor temperature must be above freezing for curing to occur. 2. Special Needs Of Vintage Automobiles One of the great benefits of owning a recent-model, mass-production car is the plentiful availability of replacement parts — either new parts directly from the manufacturer or like-new ones from “donor” vehicles. But when you’re need to replace the glass on your classic car, that convenience may go out the (broken) window. This holds true both for vintage cars and the rear windows on vintage trucks. What can you do? For most replacements, your only option is to consult an auto glass repair specialist about the possibility of ordering a custom-made windshield or window for your particular make and model year. Make sure the company crafts your glass according to the appropriate NAGS (National Auto Glass Specifications) pattern. Repairing chips in a vintage windshield may prove difficult or impossible, since antique windshields are constructed with different materials and techniques than today’s repair techs are equipped to handle. Ask your auto glass specialist whether it’s wiser to leave those little chip marks alone. 3. Dealership vs. Auto Glass Shop Should you take your auto glass issue to a local dealership or simply head directly to an auto glass repair shop? Either approach has its pros and cons, namely: Cost – A dealership repair will almost certainly cost you more money. That’s because most dealerships simply subcontract the work to the same auto glass shops you could have visited yourself, adding their own markup in the process.  Convenience – If you need to have other work done on your car, from a nagging repair issue to regularly scheduled maintenance, consider leaving the auto glass job to the dealer. You may have more profitable uses for your time than running from shop to shop. Quality – A dealership will almost always use dealer glass, ensuring that the parts you receive are identical to the...

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